Snub Training – Ruger SP101

January 28, 2009

Introduced in .38 special in 1989 and in .357-Magnum in 1991 the Ruger SP101 is a five shot investment cast frame revolver. It features a frame size between that of the small Smith and Wesson J-frame and the medium Colt D-frame. Closely resembling the ubiquitous Smith Chief’s Special, the SP 101 is heavier, bulkier, and generally considered stronger.  The Ruger not only has the strongest design of any small revolver it features a unique, quick takedown feature that makes post range session cleaning a near joy to attend too. It was also at one time available from the factory with a spurless or “bobbed” hammer and with a double action only trigger.

The Ruger also has two unique cylinder release features. First, it lacks any form of checkering. Second, the Ruger release is neither moved forward toward the cylinder as is in the case of nearly all other revolvers nor pulled rearward in the fashion of the Colts. The Ruger cylinder release is pressed inward, into the frame. Lacking checkering makes it is nearly impossible to have the cylinder release “bite” the shooters hand during recoil. Pressing in on the release also makes it the easiest release to manipulate for one-hand-only reloading for both left- and right handed shooters. Ed Lovette himself has noted that he prefers the Ruger’s cylinder release to that of any other revolver’s.

Due to its heft, the Ruger SP101 is one of the few small sized snub revolvers that is not distinctly unpleasant to shoot when loaded with .357-Magnum ammunition.  The SP 101consistently proves to be an exceptionally accurate snub. Rumors of an alloy framed or titanium frame version have yet to materialize.


Snub Training – S&W Model 15

January 26, 2009

A six shot, .38-caliber blue steel Smith revolver of medium size or K-frame. It was manufactured by Smith and Wesson and was available with a two inch barrel. The blue steel Model 15 is distinct from the Model 10 in having an adjustable rear sight. This feature permits the snub’s owner to adjust for point-of-aim, point-of-impact changes when shooting various bullet weights.


Snub Training – S&W Model 12

January 22, 2009

A six shot, .38-caliber aluminum-alloy frame Smith revolver of medium size or K-frame. It was manufactured by Smith and Wesson and was available with a two inch barrel. It was a light weight version of the Model-10 and much loved by the lucky shooters who own them. It is also known as the Military & Police Airweight


Snub Training – S&W Model 10

January 20, 2009

A six shot, .38-caliber blue steel Smith revolver of medium size or K-frame. It was manufactured by Smith and Wesson and was available with a two inch barrel. It was the most common Smith and Wesson snub until the advent of the five shot Chief Special. The blue steel Model 10 is also known as the Military and Police (M&P) It was superseded by stainless steel Model 64.


Snub Training – Colt Magnum Carry

January 15, 2009

The Magnum Carry was a short lived effort by Colt to re-introduce the Detective Special.  Manufactured in stainless steel, with a factory “bobbed” hammer, an improved front sight and chambered in .357-Magnum caliber.  Regrettably it was abandoned by Colt before its myriad of small problems could be corrected.


Snub Training – Fitz Special

January 13, 2009

Named for Colt shooter and employee J. H. FitzGerald who took various Colt .38- and .45-caliber revolvers, cut the barrels down to two-inches, “bobbed” the hammer spurs, cut away the front of the trigger guards and removed the “button” at the tip of the ejector rods. This work was done in an attempt to make a practical self-defense belly gun. Snub revolvers featuring some, most or all of these features are referred to as FitzGerald Specials or Fitz Specials.


Snub Training – Colt Detective Special

January 11, 2009

Colt’s six shot, .38-caliber blue steel revolver of medium size or D-frame. It is the original double action, short barrel revolver that popularized the snub genre. The Detective Special saw several changes or “series.” The First Series had a distinct exposed ejector rod and square butt. The Second Series retained the exposed ejector rod but introduced a rounded butt. The Third Series introduced an ejector rod shroud and changes in the internal lockwork. There was a final effort at producing the Detective Special called the Magnum Carry series which ran only briefly during the 1990’s